UK weather forecast TODAY – Temperatures to plummet as freezing air from Greenland set to blast Britain

FREEZING air is set to grip Britain this weekend, putting an end to this year's run of scorching temperatures.

At the end of this week, the mercury is set to plummet to the low teens with a chance of dropping to single figures as an area of low pressure moves in.

This comes as the Met Office has issued a yellow weather alert as strong northerly winds and torrential rain sweeps the country.

The alert is centred on parts of Norfolk and Suffolk but the entire UK is expected to suffer strong gales and wet weather for much of tomorrow.

The Met Office warned of potential power cuts, train chaos, traffic jams and coastal areas being affected by large waves.

The alert comes as Britain experienced it's coldest September night since 1997, with temperatures plummetting to -5C at Altnaharra in the Scottish Highlands.

Follow our weather live blog for all the latest news and updates…

  • YELLOW WARNING FOR TODAY – WHAT TO EXPECT

    • Some delays to road, rail, air and ferry transport are likely
    • Probable disruption to bus and train services with some journeys taking longer
    • Delays for high-sided vehicles on exposed routes and bridges likely
    • Some short term loss of power and other services is possible
    • Coastal routes, sea fronts and coastal communities affected by spray and/or large waves

    VIRUS EVEN IMPACTING WEATHER

    Coronavirus is having a big impact on the ability to predict the weather, according the Met Office.

    A spokesperson told the Liverpool Echo: “The lack of aircraft was something that had a major impact, it isn't the only source of data we rely on, but we had a fall in those observations.

    “Aircraft flying over remote areas of the globe gives us very valuable data that is hard to replicate.”

    “It wasn't that we didn't know what was going on at all, but when you don't have the volume of planes going over, you don't get the same detail, some of the subtleties were lost, such as where exactly the jet stream was.”

    GREENLAND BLAST CHILLS UK

    Temperatures are plunging in the UK thanks to icy blasts blowing in from Greenland.

    BBC Weather forecasters attribute the change in conditions to remnants of Hurricane Teddy, which

    hit Canada earlier this week.

    “As Hurricane Teddy moves northwards towards Atlantic Canada, it will cause the jet stream to intensify and also dive south-eastwards over the north Atlantic towards France and Spain.

    “This will help low pressure areas to track overhead the UK and eventually pull in colder air from Greenland.”

    STRONG WINDS AND PERSISTENT RAIN HEADING

    Parts of Britain will be hit by 65mph gusts on Friday after the coldest September night since 1997, say forecasters.

    The Met Office warned strong gusts and 'persistent rain' will hit the east from 9am amid fears over power cuts, train disruption and road delays.

    It comes after the mercury fell to -5C in the Scottish Highlands last night – making it the coldest September night in 23 years.

    Strong northerly winds are expected to develop across East Anglia tomorrow morning and persist into the evening, with gusts of 45mph to 55mph likely with 60mph to 65mph gusts at times in coastal areas – bringing winds of up to 65mph.

    PICTURED: LONDON RAINBOW

    ASTEROID PASSED EARTH THIS MORNING

    Lucky astronomers photographed the moment an asteroid called 2020 SW passed the earth during the early hours of this morning.

    The asteroid came within just seven percent the distance of the Earth and the Moon, or roughly 27,000 kilometres.

    The Virtual Telescope Project said: “The image comes from a single, 180-seconds exposure, remotely taken with the 'Elena' (PlaneWave 17″+Paramount ME+SBIG STL-6303E) robotic unit available at Virtual Telescope.

    “The telescope tracked the apparent motion of the asteroid, this is why stars show as trails, while the asteroid looks like a bright and sharp dot of light in the center of the image, marked by an arrow.

    YELLOW ALERT OVER GALES

    The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for parts of Norfolk and Suffolk ahead of strong gales tomorrow.

    The UK's weather service issued the warning on Thursday, and highlighted large parts of East Anglia, including Norwich, Ipswich Colchester, Harwich, Orford, Acle, Watton, Aylsham and Holt.

    The warning reads: “Strong northerly winds may lead to some disruption from Friday morning and through the evening.”

    FROSTY WEEKEND FORECAST

    The Met Office has forecast widespread grass frost by Saturday.

    It blames Hurricane Teddy, churning towards Greenland, for helping to shunt stormy Atlantic low pressure and cold air to Britain.

    September had been on track to be one of the driest for 254 years in England and Wales. Most of the South has had virtually no rain all month.

    Met Office forecaster Marco Petagna said: “It's wet, wet, wet. The UK will move into much colder air on the north side of the Atlantic jet stream.

    “Hurricane Teddy's heat is building a high pressure area driving low pressure and cold air south across the UK.”

    HEAVY SHOWERS THIS EVENING

    Heavy showers are affecting some areas this evening according to the Met Office.

    Some particularly heavy showers and thunderstorms are currently across parts of Yorkshire.

    If you are travelling in this area during the next couple of hours, be aware of spray on the roads and the potential for downpours.

    PICTURED: WEST YORKSHIRE HIT BY HAILSTONES

    SINGLE FIGURES TO HIT THE END OF THIS WEEK

    Freezing air from Greenland is heading to Britain as weekend temperatures are set to plunge dramatically.

    The end of this week will see the mercury plummet to the low teens and even single figures as an area of low pressure moves in from the continent.

    MET OFFICE SAYS COVID IMPACTS WEATHER PREDICTIONS

    Coronavirus is having a big impact on the ability to predict the weather, according the Met Office.

    A spokesperson told the Liverpool Echo: “The lack of aircraft was something that had a major impact, it isn't the only source of data we rely on, but we had a fall in those observations.

    “Aircraft flying over remote areas of the globe gives us very valuable data that is hard to replicate.”

    “It wasn't that we didn't know what was going on at all, but when you don't have the volume of planes going over, you don't get the same detail, some of the subtleties were lost, such as where exactly the jet stream was.”

    YELLOW ALERT – WHAT TO EXPECT

    • Some delays to road, rail, air and ferry transport are likely
    • Probable disruption to bus and train services with some journeys taking longer
    • Delays for high-sided vehicles on exposed routes and bridges likely
    • Some short term loss of power and other services is possible
    • Coastal routes, sea fronts and coastal communities affected by spray and/or large waves

    MET OFFICE ISSUES YELLOW ALERT

    The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for parts of Norfolk and Suffolk ahead of strong gales tomorrow.

    The UK's weather service issued the warning on Thursday, and highlighted large parts of East Anglia, including Norwich, Ipswich Colchester, Harwich, Orford, Acle, Watton, Aylsham and Holt.

    The warning reads: “Strong northerly winds may lead to some disruption from Friday morning and through the evening.”

    COAST TO BE BIT BY 70MPH WINDS

    Coastal areas in the north and east of Norfolk are bracing for 70mph winds tipped to hit tomorrow, say reports.

    A spokesperson for WeatherQuest said: “It is going to be quite a wet and blustery day in the north and west of the region.

    “The north and east coastlines will be affected all day but the west of the county in places like King’s Lynn could see some brighter spells towards the end of the day.”

    VIRUS EVEN IMPACTING WEATHER

    Coronavirus is having a big impact on the ability to predict the weather, according the Met Office.

    A spokesperson told the Liverpool Echo: “The lack of aircraft was something that had a major impact, it isn't the only source of data we rely on, but we had a fall in those observations.

    “Aircraft flying over remote areas of the globe gives us very valuable data that is hard to replicate.”

    “It wasn't that we didn't know what was going on at all, but when you don't have the volume of planes going over, you don't get the same detail, some of the subtleties were lost, such as where exactly the jet stream was.”

    WET WET WET

    Showers are bringing some torrential rain in places today, along with thunder, lightning and hail.

    FROSTY FOR BREAKFAST

    Rural areas are expected to see temperatures fall to below freezing overnight on Saturday, with -5c possible.

    Towns and cities – including Manchester and Newcastle – could also see it drop to minus figures with -1c expected.

    It will mean a widespread frost for large swathes of the country.

    Earlier this week, forecasters urged sunbathers to make the most of the blast of summer weather.

    CHILLY CHANGES

    Tom Morgan, from the Met Office, said most of Britain “is now seeing a marked change in weather.”

    And he warned of “strong winds and gales” in south Wales and the south west of England.

    He said: “The next few days will be dominated by low pressure, with gales in the south west and rain sweeping across most parts. of the UK.

    “There could be severe gales with the potential for trees to come down.”

    GREENLAND BLAST CHILLS UK

    Temperatures are plunging in the UK thanks to icy blasts blowing in from Greenland.

    BBC Weather forecasters attribute the change in conditions to remnants of Hurricane Teddy, which hit Canada earlier this week.

    “As Hurricane Teddy moves northwards towards Atlantic Canada, it will cause the jet stream to intensify and also dive south-eastwards over the north Atlantic towards France and Spain.

    “This will help low pressure areas to track overhead the UK and eventually pull in colder air from Greenland.”

    COOLING OFF

    TEMPERATURES FOR THE REST OF THE DAY

    Temperatures will stay in the mid to high teens for the rest of the day in the south.

    However in the northern parts of the UK, temperatures will peak at 10C and lows will stay around 7C.

    YELLOW ALERT OVER GALES

    The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for parts of Norfolk and Suffolk ahead of strong gales tomorrow.

    The UK's weather service issued the warning on Thursday, and highlighted large parts of East Anglia, including Norwich, Ipswich Colchester, Harwich, Orford, Acle, Watton, Aylsham and Holt.

    The warning reads: “Strong northerly winds may lead to some disruption from Friday morning and through the evening.”

    TRAVEL DISRUPTION FEARS

    Parts of Britain will be hit by 65mph gusts on Friday after the coldest September night since 1997, say forecasters.

    The Met Office warned strong gusts and 'persistent rain' will hit the east from 9am amid fears over power cuts, train disruption and road delays.

    It comes after the mercury fell to -5C in the Scottish Highlands last night – making it the coldest September night in 23 years.

    Strong northerly winds are expected to develop across East Anglia tomorrow morning and persist into the evening, with gusts of 45mph to 55mph likely with 60mph to 65mph gusts at times in coastal areas – bringing winds of up to 65mph.

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