Rampaging animals terrorise villagers in Indonesia

Revenge of the monkeys: Rampaging animals terrorise villagers, with dozens stealing food and clothes and vandalising homes after they were forced from their habitat in Indonesia

  • Long-tailed macaques were forced out of their trees when a new hotel was built
  • Footage shows them converging on homes in the village of Lembang, West Jjava
  • Locals claim the monkeys are stealing food and pulling tiles from their roofs 

Dozens of wild monkeys are terrorising villagers in Indonesia after they were forced from their habitats to make way for a hotel. 

The long-tailed macaques have left their woodland homes and started harassing villagers in Lembang on the island of Java.  

Locals claim the monkeys are stealing food, clothes and pulling tiles from their roofs. Footage recorded on Tuesday shows the out-of-control monkeys squealing while running across the rooftops. 

Another video captured in the same area showed the creatures occupying a rooftop near a balcony after invading one of the homes in in the village.

Invasion: Monkeys race across a rooftop in an Indonesian village where locals say the long-tailed macaques have been harassing them since they were forced from their usual habitat 

Local resident Tedi Kurniawan said: ‘We have never seen as many monkeys as this come to our village. Sometimes one or two come, but recently they often came in groups.’

Neighbours say the monkeys are unpredictable and swarm the area in large groups, usually late in the afternoon or early in the morning.

Tedi said he was most concerned by the monkeys stealing food from shops and clothes from the washing lines while they are being dried under the sun.

Roof tiles on houses are also often damaged because of the monkeys jumping around on top of them, locals say.

Occupation: Some of the monkeys on a rooftop near a balcony in the village of Lembang, near where a new tourist resort has been built 

Danger: Roof tiles on houses are also often damaged because of the monkeys jumping around on top of them, locals say 

Residents believe the monkeys are leaving their natural habitat in nearby woodland after they were disturbed by the construction of a tourist resort

Another worried local named Yanti added: ‘They come in lots, maybe around 30 to 50 monkeys each time.’

Residents believe the monkeys are leaving their natural habitat in nearby woodland after they were disturbed by the construction of a tourist resort.

Officers from the West Java Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) have been mobilised to investigate the unusual behavior of the wild monkeys.

West Java BKSDA officer Taufik Hamzah said: ‘It is necessary to coordinate all parties including the community around the forest area to determine what needs to be done so that the monkeys will no longer enter the village.’

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