North Korea 'test fires new kind of long-range cruise missile'

North Korea ‘test fires new kind of long-range cruise missile’ in fresh confrontation with the West

  • State media, KCNA, said the missiles flew 930 miles before hitting their targets
  • North Korean leadership believe the missiles will provide ‘effective deterrence’
  • It comes amid a protracted stand off with the United States of de-nuclearisation 

North Korea carried out successful long-range cruise missile tests over the weekend, its state media, KCNA, said on Monday.

The missiles flew 930 miles before hitting their targets and falling into the country’s territorial waters during the tests held on Saturday and Sunday, the broadcaster said. 

It added that the North Korean leadership believed the missiles would provide ‘another effective deterrence’ to ‘military manuevers of hostile forces’. 

The tests come amid a protracted standoff with the United States over de-nuclearisation.

To add to the level of provocation, the tests are also said to have taken place across the weekend, when the US fell silent to mark the 20th anniversary of 9/11 – carried out by Islamic terror group Al-Qaeda.

The reclusive North, led by ‘Supreme Leader’ Kim Jong Un, has long accused the United States and South Korea of ‘hostile policy’ toward Pyongyang. 

The broadcaster said the North Korean leadership (pictured: Leader Kim Jong Un) believed the missiles would provide ‘another effective deterrence’ to ‘military manuevers of hostile forces’

The reclusive North has long accused the United States and South Korea of ‘hostile policy’ toward Pyongyang. Pictured: A military display in the capital in January this year

Talks aimed at dismantling the North’s nuclear and ballistic missile programmes in return for U.S. sanctions relief have stalled since 2019.

It comes as it was last week revealed that the U.S. special representative for North Korea will travel to Tokyo next week for talks with South Korean and Japanese counterparts on the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and other issues.

Ambassador Sung Kim will also discuss ‘the immediate resolution of the abductions issue’ during his visit, the department said in a statement on Friday.

It comes as North Korea staged a nighttime military parade, with personnel in orange hazmat suits, tractors, and fire engines taking centre stage, rather than the usual missiles.

The celebration, which marked the 73rd anniversary of the country’s foundation, featured rows of people marching in orange hazmat suits with medical-grade masks in an apparent symbol of anti-coronavirus efforts.

It took place against the backdrop of a worsening economic crisis, with self-imposed coronavirus border closures aggravating shortages of food, medicine and fuel in the reclusive state. 

North Korea has staged a nighttime military parade, with personnel in orange hazmat suits (pictured), tractors, and fire engines taking centre stage, rather than the usual missiles

The overnight event in Pyongyang’s Kim Il Sung square on Wednesday marked the 73rd anniversary of the foundation of North Korea

A slim-looking Kim Jong Un (centre) was seen among the unmasked crowds smiling to onlookers and hugging children at the event

A slim-looking Kim Jong Un was seen among the unmasked crowds smiling to onlookers and hugging children at the event, which began at midnight on Wednesday in Pyongyang’s Kim Il Sung square, according to the official KCNA news agency.

The leader, who almost always wears a Mao suit at official functions, was dressed in a Western-style suit and tie and did not deliver a speech at the event. 

On Thursday, Rodong Sinmun, the ruling Worker’s Party’s newspaper, published photographs of the hazmat-suited members of the Worker-Peasant Red Guards, the country’s largest civilian defence force. 

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