Louisiana residents who did not evacuate ahead of Hurricane Laura are calling for help, but authorities can’t get to them

  • Residents of a parish in Louisiana who did not evacuate ahead of Hurricane Laura are now calling for aid.
  • "People are calling the building but there ain't no way to get to them," Tony Guillory, the president of the police jury in Calcasieu Parish, told The Associated Press.
  • Blocked roads, downed power lines, and flooding makes it extremely hard to save them, Guillory said.
  • John Bel Edwards, the governor of Louisiana, ordered the evacuation of a number of cities and parishes in the south of the state, including Calcasieu, on Monday.
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Residents of a parish near Lake Charles, Louisiana, who did not evacuate ahead of Hurricane Laura are calling for rescue — but it may be too late.

As of Thursday morning, Hurricane Laura, a Category 3 storm, was moving inland over Louisiana with winds of up to 120 miles-per-hour.

"People are calling the building but there ain't no way to get to them," Tony Guillory, the president of the police jury in Calcasieu Parish, told The Associated Press (AP.)

"Blocked roads, downed power lines, and flooding" make that task extremely complicated, Guillory told the AP.

On Monday, John Bel Edwards, the governor of Louisiana, ordered the evacuation of a number of cities and parishes in the south of the state, including Calcasieu Parish, which borders Texas.

"Things are very, very serious," Edwards told Fox News on Wednesday. "Quite frankly the storm surge is going to be a huge threat to life and, in fact, the National Weather Service took the unprecedented step of saying the storm surge is going to be unsurvivable."

Satellite footage of the landfall of Hurricane Laura in Louisiana at 1 a.m. CT on Thursday.
Twitter/NOAA Satellites

Laura made landfall near Cameron, Louisiana, at 1 a.m. CDT on Thursday as a Category 4 storm. It was later downgraded.

On Tuesday, Greg Abbott, the governor of Texas, issued evacuation orders for around 385,000 people living across the Texan cities of Beaumont, Galveston, and Port Arthur.

Storm surge warnings are in place for areas between High Island Texas to the Mouth of the Mississippi River, according to the NHC.

The storm is due to pass over Louisiana and into Arkansas by the end of the Thursday, the forecast said.

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