Husband of Halyna Hutchins 'is set to file wrongful death lawsuit'

Husband of Rust cinematographer Halyna Hutchins has hired lawyers and ‘is set to file wrongful death lawsuit’

  • Matthew Hutchins has reportedly hired a law firm based in Los Angeles
  • He is going to file a wrongful death lawsuit, according to a report
  • Hutchins was killed on the set of Rust when she was shot by Alec Baldwin 
  • The cinematographer was shot dead on the set of Rust on October 21 

The husband of Halyna Hutchins, the cinematographer who was shot dead on the set of Alec Baldwin’s movie Rust, has hired lawyers and is set to file a wrongful death lawsuit, according to a report.

Matthew Hutchins has hired the firm Panish, Shea, Boyle and Ravipudi in Los Angeles, TMZ reports.

Sources told the outlet that there will be multiple defendants in the suit and it will be filed on behalf of Matthew and their son Andros, nine.

The husband of Halyna Hutchins, the cinematographer who was shot dead on the set of Alec Baldwin’s movie Rust, has reportedly hired lawyers and is set to file a wrongful death lawsuit 

Matthew Hutchins has hired the firm Panish, Shea, Boyle and Ravipudi in Los Angeles, TMZ reports. They are pictured together with their son

Hutchins was shot and killed during rehearsals for the film in Santa Fe, New Mexico on October 21. The film set is seen on the day after the shooting

The news of the lawsuit comes after it was revealed Baldwin and the crew of Rust were accused of breaking at least four key movie industry gun safety protocols before the fatal shooting of Hutchins.   

Baldwin and his co-workers appear to have violated rules from the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, against pointing a gun at a member of the cast or crew unless absolutely necessary. 

The alliance’s rules – last revised in April 2003 – warn: ‘Refrain from pointing the firearm at anyone, including yourself. If it is absolutely necessary to do so on camera, consult the property master or other safety representative… Remember that any object at which you point a firearm could be destroyed.’ 

Baldwin is said to have broken that rule by pointing the gun at Hutchins and firing, killing her, having been told moments before that the gun was ‘cold’ – empty of rounds. 

Guidance goes on to state that live ammunition must never be brought onto a set, with the document also warning ‘BLANKS CAN KILL.’

It continues: ‘TREAT ALL FIREARMS AS THOUGH THEY ARE LOADED. “LIVE AMMUNITION” IS NEVER TO BE USED NOR BROUGHT ONTO ANY STUDIO LOT OR STAGE.’  

Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office say they believe a live round was loaded into the gun that killed Hutchins, 42, on October 21. 

They are continuing to investigate the circumstances of the tragedy, amid recent claims the bullet feared to have killed Hutchins may have been deliberately loaded into the gun as an act of foul play. 

The news of the lawsuit comes after it was revealed Baldwin and the crew of Rust were accused of breaking at least four key movie industry gun safety protocols before the fatal shooting of Hutchins 

Any weapons on set are also never to be used for ‘horseplay’, the alliance guidelines state, and must never be left attended. 

But according to reports, the gun the 63-year-old actor used to accidentally kill Halyna Hutchins was used by crew members to shoot at beer cans just hours before the incident, in a game known as ‘plinking.’

The weapon used in the deadly shooting is also said to have been left unattended for two hours beforehand. 

The alliance, which serves as a union representing workers on sets of films and television shows, issued an industry-wide set of safety standards and rules governing the use of guns. Those have been obtained by Fox Digital

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