Homes with access to the stunning Blenheim Palace estate go on sale

‘England’s finest view’: Luxury new homes with free access to the stunning Blenheim Palace estate where Winston Churchill was born go on sale for up to £1.2million

  • Luxury Park View development is nestled close to the impressive country home in Woodstock, Oxfordshire 
  • The largest home in the estate features five bedrooms, three bathrooms and is listed for sale for £1.2million 
  • Properties will have free access to the Blenheim Palace estate which was described as ‘England’s finest view’

A collection of luxury homes with free access to the vast Blenheim Palace estate have gone on the market for up to £1.2million.  

The Park View development, nestled close to the grand country house in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, features a series of one and two bedroom apartments alongside two, three, four and five-bedroom homes, all of which overlook ‘England’s finest view.’

Those who live in the development will have free access to the 2,000-acre Blenheim Palace estate, which boasts lush ancient woodland, lakes and the beloved parkland designed by landscape architect Capability Brown.

It also includes the Vanburgh Bridge, which forms the approach to the house. Winston Churchill’s father, Lord Randolph Churchill, once described it as the ‘finest view in England’. 

Blenheim Palace, the residence of the Dukes of Marlborough, is one of England’s largest houses – built between 1705 and 1722 and designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

The largest of the properties listed by Blenheim Estate Homes is Thornhill, which features five bedrooms, three bathrooms and an internal double garage over 2,540 sq ft of living space.

The Park View development, nestled next to Blenheim Palace (pictured) in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, features a series of one and two bedroom apartments alongside two, three, four and five-bedroom homes

The largest of the properties listed by Blenheim Estate Homes is Thornhill (pictured), which features five bedrooms, three bathrooms and an internal double garage over 2,540 sq ft of living space

The home is named after Sir James Thornhill, who painted the ceiling in Blenheim Palace’s Great Hall.    

Thornhill was designed with cavity wall insulation, thermostatically controlled gas central heating and a smart meter to monitor electricity usage. It also has low energy lighting fitted throughout and intelligent heating with underfloor heating upstairs.

Outside, there is a large garden and patio, and hedgehog highways have been incorporated into garden fences, with bee bricks in walls and swift boxes in the eaves to encourage wildlife to visit.  

It is on the market for £1.2million, alongside other properties which will eventually make up 300 homes on the impressive development, designed to be an extension of the market town of Woodstock. 

Demand for homes in the development was so high 90 per cent of the first batch of 40 properties sold within six weeks of going on sale. Only two remain on the market, including Thornhill.   

The home is named after Sir James Thornhill, who painted the ceiling in Blenheim Palace’s Great Hall. Pictured: A bedroom inside the property

Thornhill was designed with cavity wall insulation, thermostatically controlled gas central heating and a smart meter to monitor electricity usage. Pictured: The kitchen

The living room at Thornhill features a stunning fireplace, with wooden floors in the hallway and doors which open out onto the garden

Thornhill also has low energy lighting fitted throughout and intelligent heating with underfloor heating upstairs

Homeowners will be able to access the Blenheim Palace estate freely, and enjoy views of the only non-royal, non-episcopal country house in England to hold the title of palace over the River Glyme.

The Blenheim Estate has opened up several permissive paths in and around the estate, with a new cycle path linking the new development to Woodstock.

The land on which Blenheim Palace stands was given as a gift to John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, following his military triumphs against the French and Bavarians in the War of the Spanish Succession. 

Construction began in 1705 with financial support from Queen Anne, but the Crown cancelled investment on the project in 1712 after it became the subject of political infighting. 

The palace became the home of the Churchill family for the next 300 years, and was the birthplace of former Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1874. 

Thornhill is on the market for £1.2million, alongside other properties which will eventually make up 300 homes on the impressive development (pictured), designed to be an extension of the market town of Woodstock

The property also features a family room, living room, study, utility room and five bedrooms, two of which have ensuites. Pictured: The kitchen

The Blenheim Estate has opened up several permissive paths in and around the estate, with a new cycle path linking the new development to Woodstock. Pictured: The family room

Those who live in the development will have free access to the 2,000-acre Blenheim Palace estate, which boasts lush ancient woodland, lakes and the beloved parkland designed by landscape architect Capability Brown

The land on which Blenheim Palace (pictured) stands was given as a gift to John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, following his military triumphs against the French and Bavarians in the War of the Spanish Succession

Throughout its past, various members of the family have made changes to the interiors, surrounding parks and gardens, before it was saved from ruin by the 9th Duke of Marlborough’s marriage to US railroad heiress Consuelo Vanderbilt in 1895.

A spokesman for the Park View development said: ‘At Park View we’re creating new homes differently to other developers.

‘By planning and building patiently, choosing partners who share our values, using materials and designs which fit the local style, and preserving habitats and routes for wildlife, we’re building a community that we’re all proud to have as part of our legacy.

‘The homes have been designed and built to reflect the houses that are typical of Woodstock, so that even though they are new, they feel like part of the existing fabric. It’s a more sustainable way of building.

‘Using a simple palette of materials and features, like Natural Cotswold Stone and timber sash and casement windows, we’ve built the homes in a way that’s been proven to stand the test of time.’ 

Birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill: Site of the 18th century palace given as a gift to the first Duke of Marlborough following his victory over the French

Pictured: Former Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who was born at Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire in 1874

The land on which Blenheim Palace stands was given as a gift to John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, following his military triumphs against the French and Bavarians in the War of the Spanish Succession. 

Construction began on the palace, named after the Battle of Blenheim, in 1705 with financial support from Queen Anne, but the Crown cancelled investment on the project in 1712 after it became the subject of political infighting. 

The palace was completed in 1722, characterised by ‘an eclectic style and a return to national roots.’ 

Blenheim was the home of the Churchill family for the next 300 years, and was the birthplace of former Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1874. 

Throughout its past, various members of the family have made changes to the interiors, surrounding parks and gardens, before it was saved from ruin by the 9th Duke of Marlborough’s marriage to US railroad heiress Consuelo Vanderbilt in 1895. 

The country house, which features a romantic park curated by landscape gardener Capability Brown, was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

Blenheim, designed by John Vanbrugh, is described by UNESCO as ‘a perfect example of an 18th-century princely dwelling.’

The agency added: ‘In tangible form, Blenheim is an outstanding example of the work of John Vanbrugh and Nicholas Hawksmoor, two of England’s most notable architects. 

‘It represents a unique architectural achievement celebrating the triumph of the English armies over the French, and the Palace and its associated Park have exerted great influence on the English Romantic movement which was characterised by the eclecticism of its inspiration, its return to natural sources and its love of nature.’

  

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