Amber Rudd says Boris Johnson 'can't talk about banning second jobs'

Amber Rudd twists the knife: Tory former Home Secretary says Boris Johnson ‘can’t talk about banning second jobs, he’s done plenty of that himself’ as PM’s poll numbers plunge in fallout from sleaze scandal

  • She predicted PM will come under increased pressure amid Tory sleaze scandal
  • Rudd resigned as cabinet minister in 2019 over the way PM was handling Brexit
  • When Boris Johnson returned to parliament in 2015, he made earnings of £1.6m 
  • The earnings included £600,000 from columns and £450,000 from speeches

The former Home Secretary has said Boris Johnson ‘can’t talk about banning second jobs, he’s done plenty of that himself’ as he earned more than £4m from outside interests.

Amber Rudd, in an interview on LBC today, predicted the Prime Minister will come under increased pressure amid the Tory sleaze scandal. 

Rudd, who was elected as MP for Hastings and Rye in 2010, resigned as a cabinet minister in 2019 over the way Johnson was handling Brexit negotiations.

She said: ‘He can’t talk about banning second jobs because he’s done plenty of that himself.

‘I think it’s a very difficult discussion which is going to have to take place over the next few weeks and months about what the correct approach is to second jobs.’

Rudd added: ‘I think that part of the confusion, in a way, is that our whole ministerial system is set up for second jobs.’

She also said during the interview that she didn’t feel it was as dramatic as the parliamentary expenses scandal in 2009.

Amber Rudd (pictured), in an interview on LBC today, predicted the Prime Minister will come under increased pressure amid the Tory sleaze scandal

Rudd (above), who was elected as MP for Hastings and Rye in 2010, resigned as a cabinet minister in 2019 over the way Johnson was handling Brexit negotiations

Earnings included:

£450,000 from speeches

£600,000 from columns 

£500,000 from book advances and royalties 

£250,000-a-year Daily Telegraph column 

It was revealed this week that Boris Johnson has earned more than £4m from outside interests in the last 14 years.   

When he returned to parliament in 2015, he earned £1.6m, mainly as a backbencher between 2018 and 2019, the Financial Times reported.

The earnings included: £600,000 from columns, £500,000 from book advances and royalties and £450,000 from speeches.

Between 2007 and 2015, tax returns while he was mayor of London revealed he earnt £2.7m.

Those earnings included a £250,000-a-year Daily Telegraph column.

He is also allegedly continuing work on a Shakespeare biography which publisher Hodder and Stoughton commissioned in 2015.

In addition, he was editor of the Spectator magazine from 2001 at the same time as serving as an MP.

Boris Johnson has not declared any new sources of private income since becoming Prime Minister in July 2019. 

It comes after the Prime Minister’s disastrous attempt to block the suspension of former minister Owen Paterson for breaking lobbying rules.

It was revealed this week that Boris Johnson has earned more than £4m from outside interests in the last 14 years

The Prime Minister ordered Tory MPs to push through measures to tear up anti-sleaze rules to help Mr Paterson. 

The vote was passed, but dozens of Tory MPs rebelled and the PM was forced to abandon the plan the following day.

The Government was then rocked by the Mail’s revelation that Sir Geoffrey had been working in the British Virgin Islands, a tax haven accused of corruption.

He has earned more than £5.5million from his second jobs since 2009. In some years he averaged more than 30 hours a week on his outside interests.

Mr Johnson told MPs this week to ‘put your job as an MP’ first and said that rule-breakers should be punished.

But he has repeatedly refused to apologise, prompting concern among ministers that he has failed to grasp the scale of public anger.

Senior ministers have let it be known they were not consulted on the PM’s decision to back Mr Paterson, who was accused of an ‘egregious’ breach of lobbying rules on behalf of two firms that paid him more than £500,000. 

Chancellor Rishi Sunak hinted at tensions over the issue, saying the Government had to ‘do better’ on the toxic issue. 

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