The View: Ana Navarro Blasts Kyrsten Sinema for Denim Vest in Senate

”Apparently, Senator Sinema’s job is to dress like Schneider from ‘One Day At a Time’ while presiding over the U.S. Senate,“ Navarro said

The View

Arizona Democrat Kyrsten Sinema wore a jean jacket vest Tuesday to preside over the U.S. Senate, and the hosts of “The View” were still absolutely gobsmacked over it on Thursday’s episode. But arguably no one was more upset than host Ana Navarro.

“Apparently, Senator Sinema’s job is to dress like Schneider from ‘One Day At a Time’ while presiding over the U.S. Senate,” Navarro sniped.

That said, Navarro acknowledged that her issue with Sinema’s attire weren’t based on gender, or the desire to call out another woman over her clothing. In fact, Navarro lamented that that’s something she and her colleagues at “The View” have to deal with.

“Here, at this show, we are very careful and we know what it’s like to get criticized for what we wear and how we look. That’s fine, it comes with the territory. And we try not to do it,” Navarro added. “But this is not about gender. I assure you, if my friend Mitt Romney showed up in the Senate wearing that, I’d call him up and tell him he’s insane.”

Really, what it all came down to for Navarro was a sense of professionalism and decorum.

“There are times when you look inappropriate. There is a dress code in the U.S. Senate, and I think you owe it to the American people and to the institution to show some respect!” Navarro said. “We [at ‘The View’] don’t come out here in robes.”

To that, Behar admitted that “we would if we could.” Host Whoopi Goldberg, who happened to be wearing a garment similar to a robe on Thursday’s show, quietly acknowledged Navarro’s unintentional dig, as the women laughed along.

In the end though, Sinema’s clothing choice wasn’t the biggest faux pas Sinema has made.

“Who cares what she’s wearing, it’s the way she votes,” Behar said. Sunny Hostin agreed, noting that about 50 percent of the time, Sinema voted with Trump.

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