'The Boys': Who Are The Seven and What Are Their Real Names?

The Boys premiered on Amazon Prime Video in 2019 and quickly gained a strong following. In the day and age of one Marvel superhero after another, there is obviously no shortage of fans looking for more comic book stories in the media, and The Boys delivered an exciting and action-packed first season.

Fans everywhere celebrated in early September of 2020 when season 2 was released, and they’re still hungry for more.

The superheroes of The Boys are referred to as The Seven. They’re mostly referred to by their superhero names, but most of their real names have also been revealed through the first two seasons of the show. So what are the enigmatic real first names of The Seven, and what powers do they have?

What is ‘The Boys’ about?

The Boys was originally a comic book series, and set in a world where superheroes live among us. However, instead of really believing in the value of using superhero powers to save the world, the superheroes in The Boys are quite egotistical and only really care about using their powers for self-centered reasons.

They don’t care about the public at all, and will even go so far as to hurt innocent people if it means it’ll get them what they want. The not-so-superheroes are called the Seven. The titular “boys” are a group of rebels who know how awful the Seven are, and are determined to stop them.

Who are The Seven?

Each of The Seven has a special superpower and of course, no superhero would be complete without a superhero name. The leader of The Seven is called Homelander.

Homelander is a sort of sociopathic Superman: He’s one of the strongest superheroes created by Vought-American, but he’s known to use his powers to rape and murder.

Starlight can fly and create a bright light, much like a shooting star. She has Christian values and is the only one of The Seven who really wants to use her powers to do good.

Queen Maeve can fly, is super strong, and is the jaded superhero of the group. Snippets of compassion show that she once cared to do good but now she’s gotten complacent. She’s also a member of the LGBTQ community and was outed by Homelander in Season 2.

The Deep was marketed as “The Man of the Seas,” and his powers don’t seem to be as strong as the other superheroes. He is able to communicate with animals living underwater. The character was introduced as a rapist after he coerced Starlight into a sexual act in Season 1. His character appears to be going through a redemption arc, but it’s too soon to tell.

A-Train is fast as lightning. He’s the only known person of color in The Seven and struggles with maintaining his speed while his addiction problems get in the way.

Finally, Black Noir is the most mysterious of the bunch, and almost always has his face covered. His superpower is that he’s incredibly strong; he’s the only one of the Seven who’s known to be physically even stronger than Homelander. He barely talks, and in general gives off a very sinister aura.

The Seven’s true names, revealed

Although the Seven are all mostly known by their superhero names above, we’ve also learned their real names over time — and some of them are remarkably boring, especially for superheroes.

According to Screenrant.com, the Seven’s leader Homelander’s real name is John (yes – just John!), which was revealed in season 1. Superhero Starlight’s true name is Annie January.

Season 2 finally revealed Queen Maeve’s true name, which turned out to be Maggie Shaw. The new season also taught us The Deep’s true name, which is Kevin. As for A-Train, his real name hasn’t been mentioned in the show yet, but it’s apparently in his character bio: His name is Reggie Franklin.

There are two members of The Seven whose real names haven’t been revealed yet. One is Stormfront; the neo-nazi’s true name isn’t even known in the comics, but fans guess that it may be revealed in future seasons. And, of course, mysterious Black Noir’s identity continues to be concealed – viewers don’t even know what he looks like, much less what is true name is.

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