'Uncut Gems': Netflix Releases Wild Mash-up of the Film, Centering on a Certain Aspect of Its Dialogue

Since it dropped on Netflix, more audiences have discovered one of last year’s most critically-acclaimed indie films, Uncut Gems. Now, many people are talking about a certain word that is used a lot of times during the film. The word is used so much in the film, it actually qualifies for a historic list that only a few films belong to.

What is ‘Uncut Gems’ about?

According to the official description of the film via its production company/distributor A24, Uncut Gems follows Howard Ratner (Sandler), “a charismatic New York City jeweler always on the lookout for the next big score. When he makes a series of high-stakes bets that could lead to the windfall of a lifetime, Howard must perform a precarious high-wire act, balancing business, family, and encroaching adversaries on all sides, in his relentless pursuit of the ultimate win.”

Aside from Sandler, the film also stars Lakeith Stanfield, Julia Fox, Kevin Garnett, Idina Menzel, Eric Bogosian, and Judd Hirsch.

Critics loved the film

The film first debuted at Telluride Film Festival. It went on to screen at the Toronto International Film Festival. After this, the film became a favorite for Academy Award predictions in several categories, mainly for Best Actor because of Sandler’s acclaimed performance.

Still, the film didn’t get any Oscar nominations. The Academy Awards may have not shown the film any love, but it was nominated for several awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor, at the Critics Choice Awards. The film’s directors, the Safdie brothers, also won Best Director at the Film Independent Spirit Awards. Sandler won Best Male Lead at that ceremony as well. Julia Fox earned several award nominations from critics groups, including a Gotham Award nomination for Breakthrough Actor

The movie has a wild amount of expletives

A video released by Netflix showcases the number of F-bombs that are in the film ― a whopping 506. It has the fourth-most F-bombs in the history of cinema. The top three films are Swearnet: The Movie (935), the documentary F**k (857), and The Wolf of Wall Street (569). The video done by Netflix is just over four minutes long.

Next time you watch Uncut Gems, take out your pen and paper and try to see if you can catch all 506!

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