UK petrol stations with fuel near me – Price close to ALL-TIME high as panicked drivers say they get through E10 quicker

LONDON and the South East are still seeing a shortage of fuel at forecourt pumps as the Army begins to deliver petrol across the UK.

The situation for fuel crisis in the South East has been blasted as “absolutely horrendous” by experts – as the Army begins driving tankers to deliver petrol.

Nearly 200 soldiers are delivering fuel in a bid to end the crisis after going through a crash HGV course.

And as panic buying begins to ease around the rest of the country,prices have reached an eight year high of £1.36 a litre as motorists continue to battle a fuel crisis.

Latest government figures show that a litre of fuel has now reached 136.1p a litre and 139.2p a litre for diesel.

Read our energy companies live blog for live updates on the crisis…

  • Louis Allwood

    Mum, 29, gives birth at petrol forecourt ‘in seconds’

    A MUM gave birth “in seconds” on the back of a pick-up truck at a petrol forecourt as she was being rushed to hospital.

    Stephanie Richardson, 29, delivered her third child Lucy Varley in the early hours of Friday morning at the Jet petrol station in Lanchester, County Durham.

    Currently, large parts of the country are in the grip of fuel chaos with many petrol stations being forced to close as they await deliveries.

    The mum, from Medomsley near Consett, had been due to be induced just four hours later but baby Lucy had other ideas and made an appearance in the back of a Nissan pick-up truck instead.

    Fortunately, Stephanie’s partner Matthew Varley, also 29, and their friend and midwife were on hand to ensure Lucy was delivered safely, weighing 6lb 15oz.

  • Louis Allwood

    PM: No alternative to staffing shortages

    Boris Johnson has insisted there is “no alternative” to the problems stemming from staffing shortages as he faced criticism for denying that the UK is in crisis.

    The Prime Minister said on Tuesday he is “not worried” about the staffing shortages which have played a role in petrol pumps running dry and risk a mass pig cull and shortages this Christmas.

    Mr Johnson played down the prospect that rising inflation rates could cancel out wage growth as he pins his long-term hopes on transitioning into a high-wage high-skilled economy in the wake of Brexit.

    Asked on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme if there was a crisis, the Prime Minister said: “No, I think that, on the contrary, what you’re seeing with the UK economy, and indeed the global economy, is very largely in the supply chains the stresses and strains that you’d expect from a giant waking up, and that’s what’s happening.”

  • Louis Allwood

    …but your boss could insist that you use public transport

    However, your employer could insist that you use public transport , although some workers might want to avoid this because of Covid concerns, particularly if they’re vulnerable.

    Rebecca Thornley-Gibson, partner at law firm DMH Stallard, said: “It will be potentially unreasonable to insist that an employee uses public transport to get to work where they have raised genuine health and safety concerns, but that does not mean an employer will have to pay an employee who does not attend work due to the transport difficulties.”

    You could also ask to change your start and finish time so you’re travelling when the roads and petrol stations are hopefully less busy or when public transport is less crowded. Alternatively, your boss could also ask you to travel to a different office location if there is one that is more accessible.

    You may be able to negotiate working from home if you have a job that can be done remotely. If you’ve worked remotely through the pandemic then you should have a strong case for requesting this.

    Thornley Gibson said: “”Employers who have a hybrid working model will see its advantages when employees are prevented from getting to work due to circumstances outside their control. The current [fuel] crisis can be added to the business continuity plans of bad weather, terrorist attacks and public transport strikes.”

  • Louis Allwood

    Your rights if you can’t get into work due to petrol crisis

    The ongoing petrol crisis has left many drivers unable to fill up and worried about getting to work.

    Widespread panic buying coupled with a shortage of delivery drivers has led to several petrol stations running dry or limiting the amount of fuel customers can get.

    And now, Boris Johnson has confirmed that the interruption could last until Christmas if not longer.

    But if you can’t get into work because you’re out of petrol, what are you rights? Here we explain everything you need to know. The good news is that you can’t be fired if you can’t get to work because of the petrol crisis.

    If your employer does try to sack you because you can’t travel, you should speak to an employment lawyer to see if you have a case for unfair dismissal.

  • Louis Allwood

    What the Government is doing to combat the crisis

    The Government has agreed to grant 5,000 temporary visas to lorry drivers and a further 5,000 to ­poultry workers to try to address shortages in those industries.

    Army personnel were seen in combat fatigues at a storage depot in Hemel Hempstead today as they filled up tankers ahead of setting off around the country.

    Around 200 members of The Army, who were put on standby last week, will initially focus on the hardest-hit areas.

    They include members of 3rd Logistic Support Regiment who have been in training with the petroleum industry logistics company Hoyers in Thurrock, Essex.

  • Louis Allwood

    AA gives advice on misfuelling

    Edmund King, AA president, said: “If a driver does find themselves in the unfortunate position where they’ve added the wrong fuel to their tank, it is vital that the vehicle is not started. 

    “Do not attempt to add the correct type of fuel to dilute as this will only add to the cost of the error and may lead to damage if the engine is started with diluted fuel in the tank. 

    “Contact your breakdown provider or garage for assistance in the first instance”.

  • Louis Allwood

    Army started delivering fuel to forecourts on Monday

    SOLDIERS began delivering fuel to forecourts on Monday as pumps continued to run dry.

    Figures showed a fifth of stations in London and the South East remained empty.

    But there were signs the pressure was beginning to ease — as Esso, BP and Shell lifted their £30 cap on fuel.

    EG Group, which runs 340 forecourts, said “customer purchasing behaviour” had “returned to normal levels in the majority of locations”.

    Around 200 soldiers were deployed Monday — half of them drivers — as part of Operation Escalin.

  • Louis Allwood

    Graph: The soaring price of petrol

    Latest government figures show that a litre of fuel has now reached 136.1p a litre and 139.2p a litre for diesel.

    It comes as many drivers are still struggling to fill their cars, more than a week after forecourts started to run dry.

    The Government produces weekly figures on average fuel prices across the country.

    The cost of petrol has increased from 113.5p a year ago, while diesel is up from 118.24p.

  • Louis Allwood

    Figures show a fifth of London’s petrol stations are empty

    Figures showed a fifth of stations in London and the South East remained empty.

    But there were signs the pressure was beginning to ease — as Esso, BP and Shell lifted their £30 cap on fuel. EG Group, which runs 340 forecourts, said “customer purchasing behaviour” had “returned to normal levels in the majority of locations”.

    Around 200 soldiers were deployed yesterday — half of them drivers — as part of Operation Escalin. A further 100 are on standby.

    But the Petrol Retailers Association warned it could take up to ten days for the disruption to end. Chairman Brian Madderson added that prices could rise by as much as 3p per litre this week after crude oil shot up three per cent to $81 a barrel — a seven-year high.

    The Prime Minister’s spokesman said: “Fuel stocks are increasing and more fuel is being delivered than is used.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    Wholesale cost of fuel driving up prices at pumps

    As well as panic-buying and stockpiling, the rising wholesale cost of fuel is causing price to rise at the pumps.

    The price of crude oil has now reached more than $81 a barrel, up from just $14.64 in April.

    A number of factors are behind this including strong demand from Asia, lower supply from Russia, and a better-than-expected economic recovery after the pandemic also putting pressure on the industry.

    While experts insist there is no actual shortage of fuel in the UK, a lack of HGV drivers means it is not being transported.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Drivers face £12.50 daily charge under ULEZ expansion this month

    LONDON’S Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) will expand this month, from a small patch in the very centre of the city to a vast area encompassing most of the capital.

    Drivers of older vehicles will need to pay a £12.50 charge before driving into this zone, or face a £160 fine.

    This mostly affects drivers of petrol cars built before 2005, and diesel cars built before 2015, but anyone unsure of their vehicle’s eligibility should check online using TFL’s website.

    These older vehicles are deemed to be the most polluting, and the Ultra Low Emission Zone is designed to reduce harmful emissions in the capital.

    London’s existing ULEZ covers the same area as the Congestion Charge zone, from Park Lane in the West to Spitalfields in the east, and from King’s Cross in the north to Vauxhall in the south.

    But from this month, it will swell to the North and South Circular roads, absorbing an area roughly 18 times the size of the existing zone.

  • Joseph Gamp

    What to do if you put petrol in your diesel car

    If you put the wrong fuel in your car by mistake, the first thing you should do is leave the car switched off.

    Turning on the engine or even putting the keys in the ignition could cause fuel to flow into the car’s engine, damaging it and making an already costly problem much worse.

    The second thing you should do is remember that you’re not alone.

    Somebody in the UK makes this easy mistake every few minutes, according to the AA, and that number is rising thanks to the current chaos at fuel stations.

    Experts call this misfuelling, and it’s on the rise as desperate Brits panic at the pumps.

    It can be particularly confusing for drivers who use fleets with multiple vehicles – even the police.

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM: Problems caused ‘very largely by economic recovery’

    Just 127 of the 300 visas for tanker drivers to come to the UK immediately have been granted, Boris Johnson said yesterday.

    The PM argued that supply chain problems are caused “very largely by the strength of the economic recovery”.

    The Prime Minister told BBC Breakfast: “What we said to the road haulage industry was: ‘Fine, give us the names of the drivers that you want to bring in and we will sort out the visas, you’ve got another 5,000 visas.’

    “They only produced 127 names so far. What that shows is the global shortage.”

    Mr Johnson added: “The supply chain problem is caused very largely by the strength of the economic recovery. What you will see is brilliant logistic experts in our supermarket chains, in our food processing industry, getting to grips with it, finding the staff that they need. We will help them in any way that we can. But the shortage is global.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    UK service sector hikes up prices

    UK service sector firms hiked prices at a record pace last month as they battled against surging cost pressures and a slump in new orders due to supply and staff shortages, new figures have shown.

    The closely watched IHS Markit/CIPS UK Services PMI survey revealed that new order growth weakened for the fourth month in a row, with new business rising at the slowest pace for six months.

    Overall service sector output was better than expected, with the report showing a reading of 55.4 in September, which is up from the six-month low of 55 recorded in August. Economists had been expecting a reading of 54.6.

    The report laid bare the pressures facing the sector, with the data showing firms resorting to passing on costs to customers, with the steepest rise in prices for services since the survey records began.

    Supply chain difficulties and staff shortages also saw a rising backlog of work in the sector, with unfinished business now having built up for seven months straight – the longest run since 2015.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Mum gives birth at petrol forecourt (continued…)

    The drama started when Stephanie woke in the middle of the night with pain and knew her baby was coming.

    She phoned the midwife who had been booked to deliver the baby at 8am but Stephanie told her she needed to come over now as Lucy was on her way.

    Stephanie told the Chronicle Live: “We were going to the hospital with my partner driving, the midwife in the front and me on all fours in the back of our pick-up. There’s no gas and air in the back of a truck.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Mum, 29, gives birth at petrol forecourt ‘in seconds

    A MUM gave birth “in seconds” on the back of a pick-up truck at a petrol forecourt as she was being rushed to hospital.

    Stephanie Richardson, 29, delivered her third child Lucy Varley in the early hours of Friday morning at the Jet petrol station in Lanchester, County Durham.

    Currently, large parts of the country are in the grip of fuel chaos with many petrol stations being forced to close as they await deliveries.

    The mum, from Medomsley near Consett, had been due to be induced just four hours later but baby Lucy had other ideas and made an appearance in the back of a Nissan pick-up truck instead.

    Fortunately, Stephanie’s partner Matthew Varley, also 29, and their friend and midwife were on hand to ensure Lucy was delivered safely, weighing 6lb 15oz.

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM: 127 drivers applied for fuel tanker visas

    Boris Johnson has said 127 drivers have applied for fuel trucker visas amid an acute shortage of drivers.

    The PM told BBC that the haulage industry had been asked to provide the details of drivers who were willing to come to Britain, and it had only given 127 names.

    “What that shows is the global shortage,” he said.

    The Times newspaper reported that just 27 fuel tanker drivers had applied.

    With fuel companies and supermarkets warning that a shortage of drivers was hitting deliveries, the government said late last month that it would temporarily reverse its immigration rules and give 5,000 visas for EU drivers to operate in Britain. It said 300 of those could arrive immediately to drive oil tankers.

  • Joseph Gamp

    AA gives advice on misfuelling

    Edmund King, AA president, said: “If a driver does find themselves in the unfortunate position where they’ve added the wrong fuel to their tank, it is vital that the vehicle is not started.

    “Do not attempt to add the correct type of fuel to dilute as this will only add to the cost of the error and may lead to damage if the engine is started with diluted fuel in the tank.

    “Contact your breakdown provider or garage for assistance in the first instance”.

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM: No alternative to staffing shortages

    Boris Johnson has insisted there is “no alternative” to the problems stemming from staffing shortages as he faced criticism for denying that the UK is in crisis.

    The Prime Minister said on Tuesday he is “not worried” about the staffing shortages which have played a role in petrol pumps running dry and risk a mass pig cull and shortages this Christmas.

    Mr Johnson played down the prospect that rising inflation rates could cancel out wage growth as he pins his long-term hopes on transitioning into a high-wage high-skilled economy in the wake of Brexit.

    Asked on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme if there was a crisis, the Prime Minister said: “No, I think that, on the contrary, what you’re seeing with the UK economy, and indeed the global economy, is very largely in the supply chains the stresses and strains that you’d expect from a giant waking up, and that’s what’s happening.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    Figures show a fifth of London’s petrol stations are empty

    Figures showed a fifth of stations in London and the South East remained empty.

    But there were signs the pressure was beginning to ease — as Esso, BP and Shell lifted their £30 cap on fuel. EG Group, which runs 340 forecourts, said “customer purchasing behaviour” had “returned to normal levels in the majority of locations”.

    Around 200 soldiers were deployed yesterday — half of them drivers — as part of Operation Escalin. A further 100 are on standby.

    But the Petrol Retailers Association warned it could take up to ten days for the disruption to end. Chairman Brian Madderson added that prices could rise by as much as 3p per litre this week after crude oil shot up three per cent to $81 a barrel — a seven-year high.

    The Prime Minister’s spokesman said: “Fuel stocks are increasing and more fuel is being delivered than is used.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    Your rights if you can’t get into work due to petrol crisis

    The ongoing petrol crisis has left many drivers unable to fill up and worried about getting to work.

    Widespread panic buying coupled with a shortage of delivery drivers has led to several petrol stations running dry or limiting the amount of fuel customers can get.

    And now, Boris Johnson has confirmed that the interruption could last until Christmas if not longer.

    But if you can’t get into work because you’re out of petrol, what are you rights? Here we explain everything you need to know. The good news is that you can’t be fired if you can’t get to work because of the petrol crisis.

    If your employer does try to sack you because you can’t travel, you should

  • Joseph Gamp

    Government cannot wave a ‘magic wand’ to solve issues, says Sunak

    There will be gaps on supermarket shelves this Christmas, industry leaders have warned, as Rishi Sunak said he cannot “wave a magic wand” to make supply chain problems go away.

    The Chancellor said the Government will do all it can to “mitigate” global supply issues, but he conceded that there is disruption and did not rule out Christmas being affected.

    It comes as around 200 military personnel – half of them drivers – are being deployed to the roads for the first time to help deliver petrol to forecourts.

    Around 22% of filling stations in London and the South East still do not have fuel, according to executive director of the Petrol Retailers Association Gordon Balmer.

    And despite ministers insisting the situation at the pumps, which has seen queues and panic buying, is easing, Operation Escalin launched on Monday.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Ways to make your petrol last longer

    DRIVERS face weeks of misery as petrol pumps continue to run dry – even as the Army steps in to deliver supplies.

    But The Sun on Sunday asked a top motoring expert to help you make the most of every drop of fuel in your tank.

    Scott Dixon, from the website thegrumpygit.com, has tips including practical advice on how you can save fuel when you are stuck in a forecourt queue.

    He also provides directions to brilliant apps and websites which will help you quickly track down gold-dust fuel near to where you live or work.

  • Joseph Gamp

    What the Government is doing to combat the crisis

    The Government has agreed to grant 5,000 temporary visas to lorry drivers and a further 5,000 to ­poultry workers to try to address shortages in those industries.

    Army personnel were seen in combat fatigues at a storage depot in Hemel Hempstead today as they filled up tankers ahead of setting off around the country.

    Around 200 members of The Army, who were put on standby last week, will initially focus on the hardest-hit areas.

    They include members of 3rd Logistic Support Regiment who have been in training with the petroleum industry logistics company Hoyers in Thurrock, Essex.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Graph: The soaring price of petrol

    Latest government figures show that a litre of fuel has now reached 136.1p a litre and 139.2p a litre for diesel.

    It comes as many drivers are still struggling to fill their cars, more than a week after forecourts started to run dry.

    The Government produces weekly figures on average fuel prices across the country.

    The cost of petrol has increased from 113.5p a year ago, while diesel is up from 118.24p.

    Source: Read Full Article