This is what your job resume should look like in 2022

video

America’s career coach on business leadership in 2022: ‘This all comes down to people’

America’s Career Coach Ken Coleman joined ‘Mornings with Maria’ to discuss how CEOs can be successful as leaders and keep their employees as the way business is conducted continues to change.

Putting a resume together can be hard, but it doesn’t have to be.

Kate Smith, a recruitment marketing executive at Futures – a U.K.-based international recruitment service that offers interim and permanent job placement, told Fox News Digital that jobseekers can craft a "perfect resume" if they take time to consider what it is they’re actually trying to achieve.

"When thinking about your resume: Be clear, concise and keep it relevant," Smith said.

SHOULD YOU WRITE A COVER LETTER? EXPERTS WEIGH IN

Here are some quick writing and design tips you should keep in mind if you’re making a new job resume in 2022.

What should or shouldn’t be included in a resume?

Job recruiters read a candidate’s resume before an interview and usually have the document ready during an interview to guide the conversation. (iStock / iStock)

Keep it short

As the old saying goes, brevity is the soul of wit. And the same apparently holds true for resumes.

"When it comes to writing the perfect resume, the best resumes are the simple ones," Smith said. 

IAN SIEGEL, CEO OF ZIPRECRUITER, ON THE RADICAL JOB MARKET SHIFT: ‘THE FUTURE OF WORK IS NOW’

POST-MILITARY RESUMES: TIPS FOR SERVICE MEMBERS ENTERING CIVILIAN WORKFORCE

Single-page resumes are ideal, but in some circumstances, a jobseeker can go over that. However, Smith said these extended resumes should be "no longer than two pages and [be] relevant to the position you’re going for."

Nix the old job titles

Taking pride in past work is a good thing in general, but jobseekers don’t have to mention everything they’ve done.

Job recruiters are only interested in hearing about roles you’ve held that apply to the job you’re currently interviewing for. (iStock / iStock)

"Don’t keep information on your resume from years ago," Smith said. "[For example,] if you’re applying for a job in finance, don’t include the retail position you held seven years ago."

Demonstrate your results

Job candidates who show an employer that they’re capable of supplying favorable results generally get a competitive edge.

"On your resume, explain the results and value you have brought to the business," Smith said.

GOING ON A JOB INTERVIEW? SAY THIS, NOT THAT

She continued, "This should be in hard facts and numbers, such as, ‘During my three years at X, I have supported the company through strategic X to achieve their goal of increasing its turnover to X.’"

Highlight transferrable skills

Jobseekers who are looking to make a move into a different industry will need to demonstrate how they’ll be a good fit for the role they’re applying for.

Resumes should demonstrate a job candidate’s skillset and qualifications. (iStock / iStock)

"If you are moving industries, add information on your transferable skills and how they’re relevant to the industry you’re moving into," Smith said.

Remove irrelevance and redundancies

There’s only so much that can fit on a resume, which is why Smith recommends jobseekers remove all irrelevant and redundant information.

"[For example,] having ‘references available on request’ isn’t needed as most companies will already assume this and will need a reference from your previous company," Smith said.

Keep your hobbies out

While some jobseekers might want to show a little personality on a resume, Smith reiterated that resumes should be focused on relaying relevant career history.

Job recruiters are looking at job resumes for relevant experience. (iStock / iStock)

"Aside from [providing] information on volunteering for your local community, etc., there is no need to include information about your personal life," Smith said. "They don’t need to know that you enjoy going to the gym or cooking."

10 JOB INTERVIEW QUESTIONS THAT CANDIDATES NEED TO ASK POTENTIAL EMPLOYERS

Headshots aren’t usually necessary

For most people and industries, professional headshots aren’t necessary.

"There isn't a need to include a headshot on your resume, this can open the door to companies focusing more on what you look like than your relevant experience and skillset," Smith said.

She added, "The focus should be solely on your career and not on your appearance."

In some creative or public-facing roles, an employer might require a headshot photo, according to Indeed – an American employment website and job board. If an employer outright requests a headshot photo, it’s acceptable to provide one.

JOB INTERVIEW 101: DO'S AND DON'TS OF FOLLOWING UP WITH HIRING STAFF

Providing a link to a LinkedIn profile or business card could potentially work as an alternative, according to Indeed.

What about the design?

The look of a job resume also matters. Most jobseekers make these documents themselves on a personal computer. (iStock / iStock)

Font, spacing and margins

Professional resume and cover letter builder Zety said jobseekers should make their resumes as easy to read as possible. 

This includes using neat font styles such as Cambria, Calibri, Helvetica and Bookman Old Style, and keeping them at a legible 10-point or 12-point size. Choosing between serif and sans-serif fonts is completely up to the resume maker, but Zety recommends jobseekers stick to using one font to keep the document consistent.

Job resumes should have use easy-to-read font that’s adequately spaced. The margins should also be even. (iStock / iStock)

For spacing, Zety said resume makers can use double-spacing before and after headings and in between work experience entries and education sections. The rest of the resume can be left in single-space or a 1.15-line space. Margins should be equal on all four sides and can range between a half-inch and one inch depending on how much space you need.

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU'RE REJECTED FOR A JOB: 6 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF, AND HOW TO RISE ABOVE IT

Acceptable colors

Job resume and cover letter template company Resume Genius said the color of a resume ultimately depends on the industry a jobseeker is hoping to work in.

Traditional industries generally view black, white and gray job resumes favorably. (iStock / iStock)

"Buttoned-up professions" in job fields like law, medicine, civil service, finance and administration might not look fondly on bright colors, according to Resume Genius. Black, gray and white are definite safe colors. However, in some cases, deep colors like navy blue, burgundy or dark green might be "acceptable" when used on a "simple resume template."

Some creative industries are open to colorful job resumes. (iStock / iStock)

Creative job fields in design, marketing, web development, art and media usually have more leeway in color selection, according to Resume Genius. When done right, color can draw attention to certain resume sections or a jobseeker’s creativity. In some cases, a person can use color to mirror the branding of a company, which often shows a job candidate’s "enthusiasm" and compatibility.

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

Format for conciseness

Resume and cover letter writing guide Resume Lab said jobseekers should format their resumes in a way that highlights "top strengths and achievements."

For section headings, Resume Lab recommends starting with contact information and following up with a summary or objective before working through work experience, education and skills. Other sections worth consideration includes courses, certifications, publications and conferences.

Job resumes should have clear sections, be arranged in reverse-chronological order and have easy-to-follow bullet points. (iStock)

Resume Lab also recommends listing work experience and education using reverse-chronological order. This means the most recent job title and school are listed up top while previous places of employment or schooling are referenced in descending order.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

The resource notes that "strategic use of bullet points" can help resume makers "save space" and get their "message across concisely."

Source: Read Full Article