Princess Olga Romanoff taught to 'never air dirty linen in public'

Queen’s distant cousin Princess Olga Romanoff says she was taught to ‘sit down and shut up’ rather than ‘air dirty linen in public’ – and that she was ‘horrified’ at being dubbed one of Prince Charles’ potential brides

  • Princess Olga, 71, is the daughter of Prince Andrew, Tsar Nicholas II’s nephew
  • She was dubbed potential match for Prince of Wales before he wed Diana in 1981 
  • Was left ‘horrified’ after mother contributed to profile of her as potential bride
  • Says Her Majesty ‘does it right’ when it comes to her approach to public life 

The Queen’s cousin Princess Olga Romanoff says she was taught to ‘sit down and shut up’ rather than ‘air dirty linen in public’.  

Princess Olga, 71, is the daughter of Tsar Nicholas II’s eldest nephew, Prince Andrew, who escaped Russia on a British warship in 1919 and lives alone at Provender, a 30-room 13th century home in Kent. 

Tsar Nicholas II was the first cousin of King George V, Queen Elizabeth II’s grandfather. 

Appearing on Lorraine today, she said that Her Majesty has the ‘right approach’ to public life, rather than royals partaking in high-profile interviews such as Harry and Meghan’s explosive chat with Oprah Winfrey. 

The Russian royal added that being a princess ‘never had an impact on her’ and that she was ‘horrified’ when she read an article dubbing her a potential love match for her third-cousin the Prince of Wales in 1967. 

The Queen’s cousin Princess Olga Romanoff, pictured in London 2016, says she was taught to ‘sit down and shut up’ rather than ‘air dirty linen in public’

Princess Olga, 71, is the daughter of Tsar Nicholas II’s eldest nephew, Prince Andrew, who escaped Russia on a British warship in 1919. She is pictured in 1968 

‘I was taught to sit down and shut up and never wash your dirty linen in public, whatever it happens to be,’ she said. ‘So I think the Queen does that right.’  

Speaking of being considered a potential bride for Charles she went on: ‘Harpers & Queen, or Harpers as it was then, did an article on me being a potential bride. 

‘But they also did about other foreign royalty, like the Swedes, the Luxembourgs, all princesses of that era in 1967 as possible suitable brides for old Prince Charles. 

‘My mother did the blurb and I didn’t know anything about it until it came out and I was horrified’. 

Appearing on Lorraine today, she said that Her Majesty has the ‘right approach’ to public life, rather than royals partaking in high-profile interviews

The Russian royal added that being a princess ‘never had an impact on her’ and that she was ‘horrified’ when she read an article dubbing her a potential love match for her third-cousin the Prince of Wales

A family tree of Ms Romanoff showing her ancestry date back to Tsar Nicholas II

‘Did you not fancy the job?’ asked host Lorraine Kelly. 

‘Not at all,’ she replied. ‘My mother said all these thing about me and I wasn’t allowed to speak for myself.’  

Olga’s parents fled Russia during the revolution, a year after the Tsar Nicholas II and his family were executed by Bolsheviks revolutionaries under Yakov Yurovsky in Yekaterinbur on July 1918. 

Through her mother is Nadine Sylvia Ada McDougall, Ms Romanoff is a descendant of William Paterson, who founded the Bank of England in 1694, and also of Henrik Borgström, who founded the Bank of Finland.   

Olga, who takes the English spelling of her surname as opposed to the Russian ‘Romanov’ – was home-schooled before moving between London, Scotland and Kent and returning to the historic home of Provender in 2000. 

Olga, who takes the English spelling of her surname as opposed to the Russian ‘Romanov’ – was home-schooled before moving between London, Scotland and Kent and returning to the historic home of Provender in 2000

Princess Olga said she was brought up in an ‘eccentric way’ and that being a royal never made much of a difference to her life. 

‘[It] didn’t make any impact at all’, she said. ‘I was brought up in quite an eccentric way, with a governess and nannies and I was very chaperoned and everything. 

‘So although I knew who my father was, it didn’t have an impact because you’re brought up with it and it doesn’t affect you.’   

Provender was bought by her grandmother Constance Borgström in 1921 and is laden with portraits of her illustrious Russian relatives.

The Romanoff descendant now spends her time restoring her UK family home and rents the servants’ wing on AirBnB in order to make extra money.  

This evening she will appear on ITV’s one-off documentary The Queen and Her Cousins, and spoke of meeting host Alexander Armstrong. 

‘Meeting Alexander was just fantastic’, she said. ‘You met someone in life and suddenly bond and he was absolutely great, we both had a great laugh, it was as if I’d known him forever.’ 

Last week Olga spoke of her admiration for the ‘quite divine’ Prince Philip in an interview with the Telegraph.   

The Romanoff descendant now spends her time restoring her UK family home and rents the servants’ wing on AirBnB in order to make extra money. She is pictured in 2006 

She said: ‘I just think he’s wonderful because A, he’s very good-looking. B, he doesn’t take bullsh–. He says it how it is even if he gets into trouble.’ 

While she is a blood relative of the royal family, Olga said she wasn’t sure she considered the Windsors ‘cousins’, because she only met them a little as a young girl, and had too many cousins to count. 

Speaking of Prince Philip, the royal said she only ever met him once but would have loved to meet him when he was younger, because he had always been one of her personal heroes. 

Upon hearing of his death, she said she felt ‘terribly sorry’ for the Queen and the royal family, especially Princess Anne, whom she knew when she was younger.   

Source: Read Full Article