Sarah Michelle Gellar Finds Out Son’s Eyesight Is Declining During Online School Lessons

The ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ actress reveals she discovered her eight-year-old son had sight issues when he was struggling during his school lessons on Zoom.

AceShowbizSarah Michelle Gellar realised her son had a sight issue as he struggled to follow school lessons on Zoom during lockdown.

The “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” star sought expert advice after noticing how much eight-year-old Rocky struggled as he squinted and blinked during online schooling sessions – and learned his eyesight was swiftly declining.

“They (doctors) said not only did he have myopia – the common term is nearsightedness – but it was progressing extremely rapidly,” Sarah revealed in an interview with “TODAY Parents“.

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The star, who is also mum to 11-year-old daughter Charlotte, admits she initially thought her son was suffering Zoom fatigue.

“I really chalked it up to screen fatigue because my kids didn’t have a lot of access to devices (before the coronavirus quarantine),” she shared. “All of a sudden they’re thrown into this world where they’re on Zoom for school and the only way they can connect with their friends afterwards is to continue on these devices. It was not something my kids were used to.”

Sarah went on to praise educators, admitting she is grateful for teachers after having to homeschool her kids with the aid of her husband, Freddie Prinze Jr.

“Kids go to school and they have professionals who are there to see that stuff and we count on that, but there is a difference when you know your own child inside and out,” she said. “California is full homeschool. It’s extremely difficult. Understanding a concept is extremely different than being able to teach a concept. I may comprehend it, but that doesn’t mean that I can explain it to my kids in a way that they follow.”

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